See also: Eve, EVE, éve, Ève, Êve, and Eʋe

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a variant of the Middle English noun even (itself from Old English ǣfen), with a pre-1200 loss of the terminal '-n', which was mistaken for an inflection. [1] See also the now archaic or poetic even (evening), from the same source.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eve (plural eves)

  1. The day or night before, usually used for holidays, such as Christmas Eve.
  2. (archaic, poetic) Evening, night.
  3. (figurative) The period of time when something is just about to happen or to be introduced
    Antonyms: evening, winter
    the eve of a scientific discovery

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • eve at OneLook Dictionary Search

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ eve” in Dictionary.com Unabridged, Dictionary.com, LLC, 1995–present.

AnagramsEdit


AiwooEdit

NumeralEdit

eve

  1. three

ReferencesEdit


EweEdit

Ewe cardinal numbers
 <  1 2 3  > 
    Cardinal : eve
    Ordinal : evelia

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

eve

  1. two

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

eve

  1. (slang) ecstasy (drug)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of eve (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative eve evet
genitive even evejen
partitive eveä evejä
illative eveen eveihin
singular plural
nominative eve evet
accusative nom. eve evet
gen. even
genitive even evejen
eveinrare
partitive eveä evejä
inessive evessä eveissä
elative evestä eveistä
illative eveen eveihin
adessive evellä eveillä
ablative eveltä eveiltä
allative evelle eveille
essive evenä eveinä
translative eveksi eveiksi
instructive evein
abessive evettä eveittä
comitative eveineen
Possessive forms of eve (type nalle)
possessor singular plural
1st person eveni evemme
2nd person evesi evenne
3rd person evensä

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Norwegian BokmålEdit

VerbEdit

eve (present tense ever, past tense eva or evet, past participle eva or evet)

  1. (reflexive) to wait, doubt, drag one's feet

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse efa, ifa.[1] Confer also with earlier ivast.

Alternative formsEdit

VerbEdit

eve (present tense evar, past tense eva, past participle eva, passive infinitive evast, present participle evande, imperative ev)

  1. (reflexive) to wait, doubt, drag one's feet

NounEdit

eve m (definite singular even, indefinite plural evar, definite plural evane)

  1. doubt, uncertainty

Etymology 2Edit

Related to eva (Etymology 2) and ev.[1]

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

eve f (definite singular eva, indefinite plural ever, definite plural evene)

  1. trace, rest

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 “eve” in The Nynorsk Dictionary.
  2. ^ Ivar Aasen (1850) , “æva”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000
  3. ^ Ivar Aasen (1850) , “Æve”, in Ordbog over det norske Folkesprog, Oslo: Samlaget, published 2000

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin aqua.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eve f (oblique plural eves, nominative singular eve, nominative plural eves)

  1. Alternative form of iaue; water

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

eve

  1. singular dative of ev