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See also: Eve, EVE, éve, Ève, Êve, and Eʋe

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From a variant of the Middle English noun even (itself from Old English ǣfen), with a pre-1200 loss of the terminal '-n', which was mistaken for an inflection. [1] See also the now archaic or poetic even (evening), from the same source.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /iːv/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːv
  • Homophones: eave, Eve

NounEdit

eve (plural eves)

  1. The day or night before, usually used for holidays, such as Christmas Eve.
  2. (archaic, poetic) Evening, night.
    • Mid-19th cent., John Clare, Autumn:
      I love to see the shaking twig
      Dance till the shut of eve
    • 1896, A. E. Housman, A Shropshire Lad, XXVII, line 42-43
      has she tired of weeping / As she lies down at eve.
  3. (figuratively) The period of time when something is just about to happen or to be introduced.
    the eve of a scientific discovery

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • eve at OneLook Dictionary Search

AnagramsEdit


AiwooEdit

NumeralEdit

eve

  1. three

ReferencesEdit


EweEdit

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

eve

  1. two

FinnishEdit

NounEdit

eve

  1. (slang) ecstasy (drug)

DeclensionEdit

Inflection of eve (Kotus type 8/nalle, no gradation)
nominative eve evet
genitive even evejen
partitive eveä evejä
illative eveen eveihin
singular plural
nominative eve evet
accusative nom. eve evet
gen. even
genitive even evejen
eveinrare
partitive eveä evejä
inessive evessä eveissä
elative evestä eveistä
illative eveen eveihin
adessive evellä eveillä
ablative eveltä eveiltä
allative evelle eveille
essive evenä eveinä
translative eveksi eveiksi
instructive evein
abessive evettä eveittä
comitative eveineen

SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Latin aqua.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

eve f (oblique plural eves, nominative singular eve, nominative plural eves)

  1. Alternative form of iaue; water

TurkishEdit

NounEdit

eve

  1. singular dative of ev