See also: Fain

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fain, from Old English fægen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad), from Proto-Indo-European *peḱ- (to make pretty, please oneself); akin to Old Norse feginn (glad, joyful), Gothic 𐍆𐌰𐌲𐌹𐌽𐍉𐌽 (faginōn, to rejoice), Old Norse fagna (to rejoice).[1]

AdjectiveEdit

fain (comparative more fain, superlative most fain)

  1. (archaic) Well-pleased, glad.
    • 1485, Sir Thomas Malory, chapter primum, in Le Morte Darthur, book XVII:
      Thus Gawayne and Ector abode to gyder / For syre Ector wold not awey til Gawayne were hole / & the good knyȝt Galahad rode so long tyll he came that nyghte to the Castel of Carboneck / & hit befelle hym thus / that he was benyghted in an hermytage / Soo the good man was fayne whan he sawe he was a knyght erraunt
  2. (archaic) Satisfied, contented.
  3. (archaic) Eager, willing or inclined to.
    • c. 1591, William Shakespeare, Henry VI, Part 2, Act II scene i[1]:
      Men and birds are fain of climbing high.
    • (Can we date this quote by Jeremy Taylor and provide title, author's full name, and other details?)
      To a busy man, temptation is fain to climb up together with his business.
  4. (archaic) Obliged or compelled to.
QuotationsEdit
  • 1900, Ernest Dowson, To One in Bedlam, lines 9-10
    O lamentable brother! if those pity thee, / Am I not fain of all thy lone eyes promise me;
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Middle English fain, fayn, feyn, from the adjective (see above).

AdverbEdit

fain (comparative fainer, superlative fainest)

  1. (archaic) With joy; gladly.
  2. (archaic) By will or choice.
    • c. 1610-11, William Shakespeare, The Tempest, Act I scene i[3]:
      Gonzalo: Now would I give a thousand furlongs of sea for an acre of barren ground— long heath, brown furze, anything. The wills above be done, but I would fain die a dry death.
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 3Edit

From Middle English fainen, from Old English fæġenian, from Proto-West Germanic *faginōn, from Proto-Germanic *faginōną.

VerbEdit

fain (third-person singular simple present fains, present participle faining, simple past and past participle fained)

  1. (archaic) To be delighted or glad; to rejoice.
  2. (archaic) To gladden.
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fīnis, fīnem.

NounEdit

fain m

  1. end

Middle EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English fæġen, from Proto-Germanic *faganaz (glad). The adverb is transferred from the adjective.

AdjectiveEdit

fain

  1. joyful, happy
  2. willing, eager
  3. pleasing, enjoyable, attractive

Alternative formsEdit

AdverbEdit

fain

  1. gladly, joyfully
  2. willingly, eagerly

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • English: fain
  • Scots: fain

ReferencesEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French foin, fein, from Latin faenum.

NounEdit

fain m (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) hay

Derived termsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin famēs.

NounEdit

fain f (nominative singular fain)

  1. hunger

DescendantsEdit

Related termsEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from German fein.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fain m or n (feminine singular faină, masculine plural faini, feminine and neuter plural faine)

  1. cool, fine, of good quality

DeclensionEdit


RomanschEdit

Alternative formsEdit

  • (Sursilvan) fein
  • (Sutsilvan, Surmiran) fagn

EtymologyEdit

From Latin faenum.

NounEdit

fain m

  1. (Rumantsch Grischun, Puter, Vallader) hay

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • (Rumantsch Grischun, Sutsilvan) fanar

Siar-LakEdit

NounEdit

fain

  1. woman

Further readingEdit

  • Malcolm Ross, Proto Oceanic and the Austronesian Languages of Western Melanesia, Pacific Linguistics, series C-98 (1988)