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FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French faloir, from an earlier falleir, from a changing of Old French faillir after its third person singular, faut, earlier falt (from Latin fallit), based off the model of valoir. Faillir derives in turn from Vulgar Latin *fallīre, from Latin fallere, fallō. Compare Franco-Provençal falêr from a similar development in Old Franco-Provençal.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fa.lwaʁ/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -waʁ

VerbEdit

falloir

  1. (impersonal) to need, have to
    Il faut que j'y aille
    I need to go.
    Faut que j'y aille.
    Got to go.
    Il a tout ce qu'il te faut.
    He has everything that you need.
  2. to take (time)
    • 1943, Antoine de Saint-Exupéry, Le Petit Prince:
      Il me fallut longtemps pour comprendre d'où il venait.
      It took me a long time to understand where he came from.
  3. (reflexive, with "en") to be missing

ConjugationEdit

This verb is defective, only conjugated in the third-person singular. This verb is impersonal and is conjugated only in the third-person singular.

This verb is defective, only conjugated in the third-person singular. This verb is impersonal and is conjugated only in the third-person singular.

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

Further readingEdit