EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Pseudo-French feminine form of fan

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fanne (plural fannes or fenne)

  1. (dated, sometimes derogatory, fandom slang) A female science fiction fan.
    • 1944, John Bristol Speer, Fancyclopedia[1], Fannes, page 31:
      Fannes — Pronounced the same as "fans," but used in writing to mean fem fans.
    • 1951 May 21, Winthrop Sargeant, “Through the Interstellar Looking Glass”, in Life[2], volume 30, number 21, ISSN 0024-3019, page 127:
      A little more than a week ago two fen and one fanne left for London as delegates to a big gathering formally billed as the Science Fiction Festival Convention but more intimately described as a fanference. [] Sad to relate, some of the European delegates were probably insurgents rather than true fen [] many of them would probably turn out to be real fen and fenne after all.
    • 1959, Terry Carr & Ron Ellik (as Carl Brandon), “The Cyclone”, in The BNF of Iz[3]:
      Dorothy lived in the middle of the great western plains, far away from any other fans. She was a very lonely little fanne, who could not afford to go to the annual World Conventions, and had been only to one Oklacon.
    • For more quotations using this term, see Citations:fanne.

SynonymsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


BourguignonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin femina.

NounEdit

fanne f (plural fannes, masculine houme)

  1. woman

ItalianEdit

VerbEdit

fanne

  1. compound of fan, the second-person singular (tu) imperative form of fare, with ne
    Fanne una copia.Make a copy of it.

AnagramsEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old English fann.

NounEdit

fanne

  1. Alternative form of fan

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English fannian.

VerbEdit

fanne

  1. Alternative form of fannen