See also: farë and faré

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From the merger of Old English fær (journey, road), a neuter, + faru (journey, companions, baggage), feminine, both from faran (to journey), from Proto-Germanic *faraną, from Proto-Indo-European *por- (going, passage).

NounEdit

fare (plural fares)

  1. Money paid for a transport ticket.
  2. A paying passenger, especially in a taxi.
  3. Food and drink.
    • 1918, W. B. Maxwell, chapter 16, The Mirror and the Lamp:
      “[…] She takes the whole thing with desperate seriousness. But the others are all easy and jovial—thinking about the good fare that is soon to be eaten, about the hired fly, about anything.”
  4. Supplies for consumption or pleasure.
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Help:How to check translations.

Etymology 2Edit

From Old English faran (to journey), from Proto-Germanic *faraną, from Proto-Indo-European *por- (going, passage). Cognates include West Frisian farre, Dutch varen, German fahren (to travel), Danish fare, Icelandic fara (to go) and Swedish fara (to travel).

VerbEdit

fare (third-person singular simple present fares, present participle faring, simple past fared or archaic fore, past participle fared or rarely faren)

  1. (intransitive, archaic) To go, travel.
  2. (intransitive) To get along, succeed (well or badly); to be in any state, or pass through any experience, good or bad; to be attended with any circumstances or train of events.
    • Denham
      So fares the stag among the enraged hounds.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34: 
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
  3. (intransitive) To eat, dine.
    • Bible, Luke xvi. 19
      There was a certain rich man which [] fared sumptuously every day.
  4. (intransitive, impersonal) To happen well, or ill.
    We shall see how it will fare with him.
    • Milton
      So fares it when with truth falsehood contends.
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


AlbanianEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdverbEdit

fare

  1. totally, wholly, completely
  2. (with negatives) at all

DanishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /faːrə/, [ˈfɑːɑ]

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

fare c (singular definite faren, plural indefinite farer)

  1. danger, hazard
  2. risk
InflectionEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old Norse fara, from Proto-Germanic *faraną.

VerbEdit

fare (imperative far, present farer, past farede or for or fór, past participle faret)

  1. rush, run (originally go)

Etymology 3Edit

VerbEdit

fare (imperative far, infinitive at fare, present tense farer, past tense farede, past participle har faret)

  1. farrow

EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

fare

  1. by the action, by the initiative, by the effort, by order

Usage notesEdit

  • Followed by the word de, forming the preposition fare de.

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin facere, present active infinitive of faciō.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [ˈfaː.re], /ˈfare/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: fà‧re
  • Rhymes: -are

VerbEdit

fare

  1. (transitive) to do
  2. (transitive) to make
  3. (transitive) to act
  4. (transitive) to get someone to be something

ConjugationEdit

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

VerbEdit

fāre

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of for

Norwegian BokmålEdit

NounEdit

fare m (definite singular faren; indefinite plural farer; definite plural farene)

  1. danger

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fara.

VerbEdit

fare

  1. go; travel
  2. rush; tear
  3. (shipping) sail
  4. (archaic, poetry) travel; voyage

InflectionEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

NounEdit

fare m (definite singular faren, indefinite plural farar, definite plural farane)

  1. danger

VerbEdit

fare (present tense fer, past tense fór, past participle fare, passive infinitive farast, present participle farande, imperative far)

  1. Alternative form of fara.

TahitianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Polynesian *fare

NounEdit

fare

  1. A house

TarantinoEdit

VerbEdit

fare

  1. (intransitive) To do or make

ConjugationEdit


TurkishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Arabic فأرة (faʾra(t)).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fare (definite accusative fareyi, plural fareler)

  1. mouse

DeclensionEdit

Last modified on 27 March 2014, at 21:56