Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, from Old French, from Latin fervens, ferventem, present participle of fervere (to boil, ferment, glow, rage).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fervent (comparative more fervent, superlative most fervent)

  1. Exhibiting particular enthusiasm, zeal, conviction, persistence, or belief.
  2. Having or showing emotional warmth, fervor, or passion.
    • 1876, Wilkie Collins, "Mr. Captain and the Nymph," in Little Novels,
      Never again would those fresh lips touch his lips with their fervent kiss!
  3. Glowing, burning, very hot.
    • 1611, King James Version of the Bible, Second Epistle of Peter, 3:10:
      But the day of the Lord will come as a thief in the night; in the which the heavens shall pass away with a great noise, and the elements shall melt with fervent heat, the earth also and the works that are therein shall be burned up.

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French, borrowed from Latin fervēntem, accusative of fervēns.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fervent (feminine singular fervente, masculine plural fervents, feminine plural ferventes)

  1. fervent

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit