Contents

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From confess, by shortening.

VerbEdit

fess ‎(third-person singular simple present fesses, present participle fessing, simple past and past participle fessed)

  1. To confess; to admit.
Derived termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Old French fesse, an alteration of faisse, from Latin fascia

Alternative formsEdit

NounEdit

fess ‎(plural fesses)

  1. (heraldry) A horizontal band across the middle of the shield.
    • 1892, Arthur Conan Doyle, ‘The Adventure of the Noble Bachelor’, Norton 2005 p.294:
      Lord Robert Walsingham de Vere St. Simon, second son of the Duke of Balmoral—Hum! Arms: Azure, three caltrops in chief over a fess sable.
    • 2009, Hilary Mantel, Wolf Hall, Fourth Estate 2010, p. 420:
      The space where the arms of Wolsey used to be is being repainted with his own newly granted arms: azure, on a fess between three lions rampant or, a rose gules, barbed vert, between two Cornish choughs proper.
TranslationsEdit

HungarianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Viennese German fesch ‎(smart, stylish), from English fashionable.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fess (comparative fessebb, superlative legfessebb)

  1. (colloquial, dated) smart, stylish, chic

Old IrishEdit

VerbEdit

·fess

  1. passive singular perfect prototonic of ro·finnadar

MutationEdit

Old Irish mutation
Radical Lenition Nasalization
·fess ·ḟess ·fess
pronounced with /-v(ʲ)-/
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.
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