DalmatianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from the feminine of a Vulgar Latin *fictus < Latin fissus, past participle of findere. Compare Italian fetta, Spanish and Portuguese fita, Sardinian and Sicilian fitta.

NounEdit

fiata f

  1. slice, cut

ItalianEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈfja.ta/
  • Hyphenation: fià‧ta

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French fiée, from Vulgar Latin *vicata (compare Italian vece), from Latin vicis (change, turn), from Proto-Indo-European *weyk- (to wind, bend).

NounEdit

fiata f (plural fiate)

  1. (obsolete) time, instance, occasion
    Synonym: volta
    • 1321, Dante Alighieri, La divina commedia: Inferno, Le Monnier (1994), Canto X, p. 155 vv. 49-51:
      «S'ei fur cacciati, ei tornar d'ogne parte» ¶ rispuos' io lui, «l'una e l'altra fïata; ¶ ma i vostri non appreser ben quell'arte».
      «If they were banished, they returned on all sides» ¶ I answered him, «the first time and the second; ¶ but yours have not acquired that art aright».

Etymology 2Edit

Inflected form of the verb fiatare.

VerbEdit

fiata

  1. third-person singular present indicative of fiatare
  2. second-person singular imperative of fiatare