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EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK, US) IPA(key): /ˈfleɪ.ɡɹənt/
  • (file)
  • (file)

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French flagrant, from Latin flagrantem, present participle of flagrare (blaze, burn). More at black.

AdjectiveEdit

flagrant (comparative more flagrant, superlative most flagrant)

  1. Obvious and offensive; blatant; scandalous.
    • 1740, David Hume, A Treatise of Human Nature
      It is certain, therefore, that in all our notions of morals we never entertain such an absurdity as that of passive obedience, but make allowances for resistance in the more flagrant instances of tyranny and oppression.
  2. (archaic) On fire; flaming.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From Latin frāgrans, participle of frāgrō (smell, reek)

AdjectiveEdit

flagrant (comparative more flagrant, superlative most flagrant)

  1. (obsolete) Misspelling of fragrant.

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French flagrant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flagrant (comparative flagranter, superlative flagrantst)

  1. flagrant

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin flagrantem (present participle of flagrare.)

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flagrant (feminine singular flagrante, masculine plural flagrants, feminine plural flagrantes)

  1. flagrant, blatant, glaring, obvious, evident
    C'est flagrant.It stares you in the face.

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


GermanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin flagrant.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

flagrant (comparative flagranter, superlative am flagrantesten)

  1. flagrant

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


LatinEdit