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See also: fläsk

Contents

EnglishEdit

 
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A French stoneware pilgrim flask.
 
Three Erlenmeyer flasks.
 
Hip flask.

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English flask (cask, keg), from flaske (case), from Anglo-Norman flascon, from Late Latin flascō (bottle), from Frankish *flasko, *flaska (whence also Dutch fles), from Proto-Germanic *flaskǭ (braid-covered bottle, wicker-enclosed jug) (whence also Old English flaxe, flasce, German Flasche), from Proto-Indo-European *ploḱ-skō (flat) (whence also Lithuanian plókščias, Czech ploský).

Sense 2 from Italian fiasco and sense 3 from Middle French flasque (powder flask), itself from Old Spanish flasco, frasco, both from Late Latin above.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

flask (plural flasks)

  1. A narrow-necked vessel of metal or glass, used for various purposes; as of sheet metal, to carry gunpowder in; or of wrought iron, to contain quicksilver; or of glass, to heat water in, etc.
  2. A container used to discreetly carry a small amount of a hard alcoholic beverage; a pocket flask.
  3. (sciences) Laboratory glassware used to hold larger volumes than test tubes, normally having a narrow mouth of a standard size which widens to a flat or spherical base.
  4. (engineering) A container for holding a casting mold, especially for sand casting molds.
  5. A bed in a gun carriage.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bailey to this entry?)

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

VerbEdit

flask

  1. imperative of flaske

DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French flasque (flask). Doublette with (native) fles (bottle), (through French) flacon (flagon) and (through Italian) fiasco (fiasco).

NounEdit

flask f (plural flasken, diminutive flaskje n)

  1. flask