EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English flue, flewe (mouthpiece of a hunting horn), of uncertain origin. Perhaps a back-formation from Middle English *flews (mistaken as a plural), from Old English flēwsa (a flow, flowing, flux). Alternatively, perhaps an alteration of Middle English floute, fleute, flote (a pipe), see English flute. Compare also Middle Dutch vloegh (groove, channel, flute of a fluted column).

NounEdit

flue (plural flues)

  1. A pipe or duct that carries gaseous combustion products away from the point of combustion (such as a furnace).
  2. An enclosed passageway in which to direct air or other gaseous current along.
  3. (obsolete, countable and uncountable) A woolly or downy substance; down, nap; a piece of this.
  4. In an organ flue pipe, the opening between the lower lip and the languet.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

AdjectiveEdit

flue (comparative more flue, superlative most flue)

  1. (Britain, dialect) Alternative form of flew (shallow, flat)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Flue” in John Walker, A Critical Pronouncing Dictionary [] , London: Sold by G. G. J. and J. Robinſon, Paternoſter Row; and T. Cadell, in the Strand, 1791, →OCLC, page 245.

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Danish flughæ, from Old Norse fluga.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fluːə/, [ˈfluːə], [ˈfluːu]

NounEdit

flue c (singular definite fluen, plural indefinite fluer)

  1. fly

InflectionEdit


EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdverbEdit

flue

  1. fluently

LatinEdit

VerbEdit

flue

  1. second-person singular present active imperative of fluō

Middle EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

flue

  1. Alternative form of flowen

Norwegian BokmålEdit

 
Norwegian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia no

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fluga

NounEdit

flue f or m (definite singular flua or fluen, indefinite plural fluer, definite plural fluene)

  1. (insect) a fly
    flue på veggen - fly on the wall

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit