See also: FOE, FoE, föe, fo'e, and

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English fo (foe; hostile), from earlier ifo (foe), from Old English ġefāh (enemy), from fāh (hostile), from Proto-West Germanic *faih, from Proto-Germanic *faihaz (compare Old Frisian fāch (punishable), Middle High German gevēch (feuder)), from Proto-Indo-European *peyk/ḱ- (to hate, be hostile) (compare Middle Irish óech (enemy, fiend), Lithuanian pìktas (evil)).

AdjectiveEdit

foe

  1. (obsolete) Hostile.
TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

foe (plural foes)

  1. An enemy.
    • 2013 June 29, “Travels and travails”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8842, page 55:
      Even without hovering drones, a lurking assassin, a thumping score and a denouement, the real-life story of Edward Snowden, a rogue spy on the run, could be straight out of the cinema. But, as with Hollywood, the subplots and exotic locations may distract from the real message: America’s discomfort and its foes’ glee.
SynonymsEdit
AntonymsEdit
Derived termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

 
English Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia

Acronym of [ten to the power of] fifty-one ergs, due to equalling 1051 ergs; coined by Gerald Brown of Stony Brook University in his work with Hans Bethe.

NounEdit

foe (plural foes)

  1. A unit of energy equal to 1044 joules.
SynonymsEdit

AnagramsEdit


Cameroon PidginEdit

PrepositionEdit

foe

  1. Alternative spelling of for

ChoctawEdit

EtymologyEdit

From English bee.

NounEdit

foe

  1. bee

Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

foe

  1. Alternative form of fo

PortugueseEdit

VerbEdit

foe

  1. Obsolete spelling of foi