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See also: fóin

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French foene (harpoon, fizgig), from Latin fuscina (trident).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foin (plural foins)

  1. (archaic) A thrust.

VerbEdit

foin (third-person singular simple present foins, present participle foining, simple past and past participle foined)

  1. (archaic) To thrust with a sword; to stab at.
    • 1976, These Fastulfrs and Falsts could drink as well as they could foin or fight, and this has also been the case with me. — Robert Nye, Falstaff
    • Spenser
      He stroke, he soused, he foynd, he hewed, he lashed.
    • Dryden
      They lash, they foin, they pass, they strive to bore / Their corselets, and the thinnest parts explore.
  2. (archaic) To prick; to sting.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Huloet to this entry?)

Etymology 2Edit

French fouine (a marten).

NounEdit

foin (plural foins)

  1. The beech marten (Martes foina, syn. Mustela foina).
  2. A kind of fur, black at the top on a whitish ground, taken from the ferret or weasel of the same name.
    • (Can we date this quote?) Fuller
      He came to the stake in a fair black gown furred and faced with foins.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French foin, earlier fein, from Latin faenum, from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)-no-, from *dʰeh₁(y)-

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fwɛ̃/
  • (file)

NounEdit

foin m (plural foins)

  1. hay

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier fein, from Latin faenum.

NounEdit

foin m (oblique plural foinz, nominative singular foinz, nominative plural foin)

  1. hay

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit