See also: fóin

EnglishEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fɔɪn/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ɔɪn

Etymology 1Edit

From Old French foene (harpoon, fizgig), from Latin fuscina (trident).

NounEdit

foin (plural foins)

  1. (archaic) A thrust.

VerbEdit

foin (third-person singular simple present foins, present participle foining, simple past and past participle foined)

  1. (archaic) To thrust with a sword; to stab at.
  2. (archaic) To prick; to sting.

Etymology 2Edit

From French fouine (a marten).

NounEdit

foin (plural foins)

  1. The beech marten (Martes foina, syn. Mustela foina).
  2. A kind of fur, black at the top on a whitish ground, taken from the ferret or weasel of the same name.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French foin, from Old French fein, from Latin fēnum, monophthongized variant of Latin faenum (hay), from Proto-Indo-European *dʰeh₁(y)-no-, from *dʰeh₁(y)-.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

foin m (plural foins)

  1. hay

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


Old FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From earlier fein, from Latin faenum.

NounEdit

foin m (oblique plural foinz, nominative singular foinz, nominative plural foin)

  1. hay

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • French: foin
  • Norman: fain