fortify

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English fortifien, from Old French fortifier, from Latin fortificō.

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VerbEdit

fortify (third-person singular simple present fortifies, present participle fortifying, simple past and past participle fortified)

  1. (military) To increase the defenses of; to strengthen and secure by military works; to render defensible against an attack by hostile forces. [from early 15th c.]
  2. (figuratively) To impart strength or vigor to.
  3. (wine) To add spirits to wine to increase the alcohol content. [from 1880]
    Sherry is made by fortifying wine.
  4. (food) To increase the nutritional value of food by adding ingredients. [from 1939]
    • 1979, Kiplinger's Personal Finance (volume 33, number 7, July 1979, page 47)
      Compare the nutrition information label of a regular ready-to-eat fortified cereal with that of a presweetened brand and you'll note that, although the sweetened one's sugar content is higher, the fortification is virtually identical.
    Soy milk is often fortified with calcium.

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