EsperantoEdit

NounEdit

fragon

  1. accusative singular of frago

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Middle French fragon, from Late Latin brisco, frisgo, probably originally of Celtic/Gaulish origin, from Proto-Celtic *brisko- (fragile, weak), from Proto-Indo-European *bʰres- (to break).[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fragon m (plural fragons)

  1. laurel, butcher's broom (and other plants of the genus Ruscus)

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Matasović, Ranko, “brisko”, in Etymological Dictionary of Proto-Celtic (Leiden Indo-European Etymological Dictionary Series; 9), Leiden: Brill, 2009, →ISBN, pages 78
  2. ^ MacBain, Alexander; Mackay, Eneas, “brisg”, in An Etymological Dictionary of the Gaelic Language[1], Stirling, 1911, →ISBN

Further readingEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Germanic *frēgōną; see *frehnaną (to ask).

VerbEdit

frāgon

  1. to ask

InflectionEdit

This verb needs an inflection-table template.

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: vrâgen
    • Dutch: vragen
    • Limburgish: vraoge
  • Middle Dutch: vrage

Further readingEdit

  • “frāgon”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek[2], 2012

Old SaxonEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the noun frāga.

VerbEdit

frāgon

  1. to ask, demand

ConjugationEdit