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FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle French frais, from Old French fres, fris (fresh, new, young, recent), from Frankish *fresk, *frisk (fresh), from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (fresh), from Proto-Indo-European *preysk- (fresh). Cognate with Old High German frisc (fresh, young, new), Old English fersċ (fresh, pure, sweet). More at fresh.

AdjectiveEdit

frais (feminine singular fraîche or fraiche, masculine plural frais, feminine plural fraîches or fraiches)

  1. fresh
    Il est frais mon poisson !
    My fish is fresh!
  2. cool (temperature)
    Une brise fraîche souffla soudain sur mon visage ; je frémis doucement.
    Suddenly a cool breeze blew across my face; I shivered a little.
  3. recent, something that has just happened
    J’aime écouter les nouvelles fraîches du matin.
    I like listening to the recent news in the morning.
Usage notesEdit
  • The traditional feminine form is fraîche, whereas the 1990 spelling reform brought in fraiche
Related termsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Oblique plural of Old French fret, frait, from Latin fractum.

NounEdit

frais m pl (plural only)

  1. cost, charge
Usage notesEdit

This meaning is a plurale tantum in Standard French, though the singular le frais is occasionally encountered, especially in Canadian French.

Related termsEdit

AnagramsEdit

Further readingEdit


IrishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronounEdit

frais (emphatic frais-sean)

  1. third-person singular masculine of fré

Middle FrenchEdit

Alternative formsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

frais m (feminine singular fraische, masculine plural frais, feminine plural fraisches)

  1. fresh

DescendantsEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French fresc, fresk (fresh, new, young, recent), from Proto-Germanic *friskaz (fresh), from Proto-Indo-European *preysk- (fresh).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

frais m

  1. (France) fresh

Derived termsEdit