See also: fraudé and fraŭde

Dutch

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Etymology

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From Middle Dutch fraude, from Old French fraude, a borrowing from Latin fraus, fraudem.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈfrɑu̯.də/
  • Audio:(file)
  • Hyphenation: frau‧de
  • Rhymes: -ɑu̯də

Noun

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fraude f (plural fraudes, diminutive fraudetje n)

  1. fraud
    De politie onderzoekt een geval van fraude.The police are investigating a case of fraud.
    Financiële fraude kan leiden tot zware straffen.Financial fraud can lead to severe penalties.
    Fraude in verkiezingen ondermijnt de democratie.Fraud in elections undermines democracy.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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  • Indonesian: fraude

French

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Etymology

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Inherited from Middle French fraude, from Old French fraude, a borrowing from Latin fraudem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fraude f (plural fraudes)

  1. fraud
  2. (education) cheating

Derived terms

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Verb

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fraude

  1. inflection of frauder:
    1. first/third-person singular present indicative/subjunctive
    2. second-person singular present imperative

Further reading

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Etymology

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frauda (fraudulent) +‎ -e

Adverb

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fraude

  1. fraudulently

Indonesian

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Etymology

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From Dutch fraude.

Noun

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fraude (first-person possessive fraudeku, second-person possessive fraudemu, third-person possessive fraudenya)

  1. fraud

Interlingua

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Noun

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fraude (plural fraudes)

  1. fraud

Latin

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Noun

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fraude

  1. ablative singular of fraus

Middle English

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Alternative forms

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Etymology

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From Old French fraude, itself borrowed from Latin fraus, fraudem.

Pronunciation

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Noun

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fraude (plural fraudes)

  1. Deceptiveness, fraudulence; a tendency to be fraudulent or deceptive.
  2. A lie or untruth; an instance or example of fraudulence or deception.
  3. A motivation or purpose that one is being deceptive or misleading about.
  4. Fraud as a legal act; the usage of deception or fraudulence.

Derived terms

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Descendants

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References

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Norman

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Etymology

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From Old French fraude (deception, fraud), from Latin fraus, fraudem (cheating, deceit, guile, fraud).

Noun

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fraude f (uncountable)

  1. (Jersey) smuggling

Derived terms

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Portuguese

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Pronunciation

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  • (Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɾaw.d͡ʒi/ [ˈfɾaʊ̯.d͡ʒi]
    • (Southern Brazil) IPA(key): /ˈfɾaw.de/ [ˈfɾaʊ̯.de]

Etymology 1

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Borrowed from Latin fraudem.[1][2]

Noun

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fraude f (plural fraudes)

  1. fraud (an act of deception)
    Synonyms: falcatrua, logro
  2. hoax (anything deliberately intended to deceive or trick)

Etymology 2

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Verb

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fraude

  1. inflection of fraudar:
    1. first/third-person singular present subjunctive
    2. third-person singular imperative

References

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Spanish

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Etymology

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Borrowed from Latin fraudem.

Pronunciation

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  • IPA(key): /ˈfɾaude/ [ˈfɾau̯.ð̞e]
  • Rhymes: -aude
  • Syllabification: frau‧de

Noun

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fraude m (plural fraudes)

  1. fraud
    Synonym: estafa

Derived terms

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Further reading

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