See also: fús, fûs, füs, FUs, and fuŝ-

AlbanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Albanian *sputja, from Proto-Indo-European *pHu-tó- (compare Serbo-Croatian pítati (to ask), Tocharian B putk- (to divide, share), Latin putāre (to prune)).

VerbEdit

fus (first-person singular past tense futa, participle futur)

  1. I insert, I put (something) in
  2. I fuck (vulgar, slang)
    Futja (karin) morë.
    Fuck it man.

AromanianEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūsus. Compare Romanian fus.

NounEdit

fus n (plural fusi / fuse or fusuri)

  1. spindle

Related termsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūsus.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fus m (plural fusos)

  1. spindle

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /fy/
  • (file)

VerbEdit

fus

  1. first/second-person singular past historic of être

HlaiEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Hlai *tʃhwuʔ (three), from Pre-Hlai *ʈwuʔː (Norquest, 2015).

PronunciationEdit

NumeralEdit

fus

  1. three

MalteseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Probably from Sicilian fusu, from Latin fusus (spindle); but perhaps merged with Arabic فُؤُوس(fuʾūs), plural of فَأْس(faʾs, literally axe), which is used figuratively for different kinds of protrusions (or is it conceivable that this Arabic use is itself influenced by the Latin?). The plural in -ien at any rate speaks in favour of an early borrowing.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fus m (plural fusien)

  1. axle, axis

Middle EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old English fūs, see below.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fus

  1. ready, eager, striving forward, inclined to, willing, prompt
    Of vr saul to be ai fus Again þe com, þat es sa crus.Cursor Mundi, 1400
  2. ardent, zealous, passionate, expectant, brave, noble: ready to depart, die; dying
    Þaa foles feluns þat war fuus All vmlapped loth huse.Cursor Mundi, 1400

Related termsEdit

  • fusen — to urge on or exhort

NormanEdit

VerbEdit

fus

  1. first-person singular preterite of êt'

Norwegian BokmålEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fúss, from Proto-Germanic *funsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pn̥tstós. Ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *pent- (to tread, go). The origin of the noun is uncertain, but is possibly related.

AdjectiveEdit

fus (masculine and feminine fus, neuter fust, definite singular and plural fuse, comparative fusere, indefinite superlative fusest, definite superlative fuseste)

  1. eager

NounEdit

fus m (definite singular fusen, indefinite plural fuser, definite plural fusene)

  1. the first one when playing a game

ReferencesEdit


Norwegian NynorskEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fúss, from Proto-Germanic *funsaz, from Proto-Indo-European *pn̥tstós. Ultimately from the Proto-Indo-European root *pent- (to tread, go). The origin of the noun is uncertain, but is possibly related.

AdjectiveEdit

fus (masculine and feminine fus, neuter fust, definite singular and plural fuse, comparative fusare, indefinite superlative fusast, definite superlative fusaste)

  1. eager

NounEdit

fus m (definite singular fusen, indefinite plural fusar, definite plural fusane)

  1. the first one when playing a game

ReferencesEdit


Old DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *fuhs.

NounEdit

fus m

  1. fox

Alternative formsEdit

DescendantsEdit

  • Middle Dutch: vos
    • Dutch: vos
      • Afrikaans: vos
      • Jersey Dutch: vośe
      • Negerhollands: vos
    • Limburgish: vósj

Further readingEdit

  • fus”, in Oudnederlands Woordenboek, 2012

Old EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-West Germanic *funs (ready, willing). Cognate with Old Saxon fūs, Old High German funs, Old Norse fúss.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

fūs n

  1. a hastening, progress
    Se þe leófra manna fús feor wlátode.He who beheld afar the dear men's progress.

DeclensionEdit

AdjectiveEdit

fūs

  1. ready, eager, striving forward, inclined to, willing, prompt
    Se ðe stód fús on faroþe.He who stood ready on the beach.
    Hwæðere þær fuse / feorran cwoman / to þam æðelinge.Nevertheless the eager ones came from afar to the lord. (The Dream of the Rood)
  2. expectant, brave, noble: ready to depart, die; dying

DeclensionEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

  • fȳsan (to send forth, impel, stimulate: drive away, put to flight, banish: (usu. reflex.) hasten, prepare oneself)
  • fȳsian, fēsian (to drive away)

DescendantsEdit


PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Borrowed from Czech fous, from Proto-Slavic *ǫsъ.

NounEdit

fus m inan

  1. (Cieszyn Silesia) Alternative form of wąs

Etymology 2Edit

NounEdit

fus m anim

  1. (Masovia) boar (male pig)
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • fus in Wielki słownik języka polskiego, Instytut Języka Polskiego PAN
  • fus in Polish dictionaries at PWN

RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin fūsus.

NounEdit

fus n (plural fuse)

  1. spindle
  2. shaft

DeclensionEdit

Related termsEdit


TarifitEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Berber *a-fuʔs. Compare Central Atlas Tamazight ⴰⴼⵓⵙ (afus) and Kabyle afus.

NounEdit

fus m (Tifinagh spelling ⴼⵓⵙ, plural ifassen)

  1. hand
  2. arm

DeclensionEdit

See alsoEdit


WestrobothnianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old Norse fúss, from Proto-Germanic *funsaz. Compare foss.

AdjectiveEdit

fus

  1. eager

Derived termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • Rietz, Johan Ernst, “FUS”, in Svenskt dialektlexikon: ordbok öfver svenska allmogespråket [Swedish dialectal lexicon: a dictionary for the Swedish lects] (in Swedish), 1962 edition, Lund: C. W. K. Gleerups Förlag, published 1862–1867, page 172