See also: Gaffer

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From gaff (hook) +‎ -er. The natural lighting on early film sets was adjusted by opening and closing flaps in the tent cloths, called gaff cloths or gaff flaps.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gaffer (plural gaffers)

  1. (film) A chief lighting technician for a motion-picture or television production.
  2. A glassblower.
    • 2003, Jennifer Bosveld, Glass Works, page 18:
      The apprentice carries a gather of glass on the blowpipe to the gaffer's bench []
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit
The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

Etymology 2Edit

Likely a contraction of godfather, but with the vowels influenced by grandfather. Compare French compère, German Gevatter.

NounEdit

gaffer (plural gaffers)

  1. (colloquial) An old man.
    • 1845, Thomas Cooper, The Purgatory of Suicides, Book the Fourth, Stanza IX:
      If thou return not, Gammer o'er her pail
      Will sing in sorrow, 'neath the brinded cow,
      And Gaffer sigh over his nut-brown ale []
  2. (Britain) A foreman.
  3. A sailor.
  4. (in Maritime regions) The baby in the house.
SynonymsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

gaffe +‎ -er

VerbEdit

gaffer

  1. to make a gaffe; to mess up; botch up
  2. to gaffer tape

ConjugationEdit

Further readingEdit


NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

(This etymology is missing or incomplete. Please add to it, or discuss it at the Etymology scriptorium.)

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

gaffer

  1. (Jersey) to grasp

WelshEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

gaffer

  1. Soft mutation of caffer.

MutationEdit

Welsh mutation
radical soft nasal aspirate
caffer gaffer nghaffer chaffer
Note: Some of these forms may be hypothetical. Not every
possible mutated form of every word actually occurs.