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See also: Gaiter

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from French guêtre, from Middle French guiestres, guestes pl, from Old French *gueste, from Frankish *wasta, *wastija, from Proto-Germanic *wastijō (garment; dress). Cognate with Middle High German wester (a child's chrisom-cloth), Middle High German westebarn (godchild), Old English wæstling (a coverlet), Gothic 𐍅𐌰𐍃𐍄𐌹 (wasti, garment; dress).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gaiter (plural gaiters)

  1. A covering of cloth or leather for the ankle and instep; see spats
  2. A covering cloth or leather for the whole leg from the knee to the instep, fitting down upon the shoe.
    • 1898, Winston Churchill, chapter 2, in The Celebrity:
      Sunning himself on the board steps, I saw for the first time Mr. Farquhar Fenelon Cooke. He was dressed out in broad gaiters and bright tweeds, like an English tourist, and his face might have belonged to Dagon, idol of the Philistines.
  3. Part of the ecclesiastical garb of a bishop.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

VerbEdit

gaiter (third-person singular simple present gaiters, present participle gaitering, simple past and past participle gaitered)

  1. To dress with gaiters.

AnagramsEdit


CatalanEdit

EtymologyEdit

gaita +‎ -er

NounEdit

gaiter m (plural gaiters, feminine gaitera)

  1. bagpiper

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

VerbEdit

gaiter

  1. Alternative form of gaitier

ConjugationEdit

This verb conjugates as a first-group verb ending in -er. The forms that would normally end in *-ts, *-tt are modified to z, t. Old French conjugation varies significantly by date and by region. The following conjugation should be treated as a guide.