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See also: Garrison

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

Old French garison, guarison, from Frankish, ultimately of Germanic origin; compare guard, ward.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

garrison (plural garrisons)

  1. A permanent military post.
  2. The troops stationed at such a post.
  3. (allusive) Occupants.
    • 1913, Robert Barr, chapter 4, in Lord Stranleigh Abroad[1]:
      “I came down like a wolf on the fold, didn’t I ?  Why didn’t I telephone ?  Strategy, my dear boy, strategy. This is a surprise attack, and I’d no wish that the garrison, forewarned, should escape. …”

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

VerbEdit

garrison (third-person singular simple present garrisons, present participle garrisoning, simple past and past participle garrisoned)

  1. To assign troops to a military post.
  2. To convert into a military fort.
  3. To occupy with troops.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

AnagramsEdit