genital

See also: génital

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English genital, from Latin genitalis (of or belonging to generation), from genitus, past participle of gignō (to beget, generate); see genus.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈdʒɛnətəl/, /ˈdʒɛnɪtəl/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

genital (not comparable)

  1. Of, or relating to biological reproduction.
  2. Of, or relating to the genitalia.
  3. (psychoanalysis) Of, or relating to psychosexual development during puberty.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

NounEdit

genital (plural genitals)

  1. (rare) A genital organ; the genitalia.
    • 1961, The Annual Survey of Psychoanalysis:
      ( b ) the masturbation [...] served as evidence that his genital was not injured ("fixing feet")
    • 1967, Ruth G. Newman, Marjorie M. Keith, The School-centered Life Space Interview, Six Papers:
      David told of his fears of castration and his concern that his genital was not as large as another boy's on the ward, and perhaps would never be.
    • 2013, Susan Isaacs, Childhood and After: Some Essays and Clinical Studies, Routledge (→ISBN), page 164:
      [] the anxiety and distress that his genital was dirty, disgusting and dangerous to his mother (myself); the dread of the bad internalized penis and his own faeces and urine.

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

genital (not comparable)

  1. genital

DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit


RomanianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French génital, from Latin genitalis.

AdjectiveEdit

genital m or n (feminine singular genitală, masculine plural genitali, feminine and neuter plural genitale)

  1. genital

DeclensionEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin genitālis.

AdjectiveEdit

genital (plural genitales)

  1. genital

NounEdit

genital m (plural genitales)

  1. (Usually plural) genital

ReferencesEdit