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See also: Germane

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EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

Variant form of german, adapted in this sense in allusions to its use in Shakespeare's Hamlet.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /dʒɜː(ɹ)ˈmeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • (US) IPA(key): /dʒɝˈmeɪn/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪn

AdjectiveEdit

germane (comparative more germane, superlative most germane)

  1. Related to the topic being discussed or considered.
    Synonyms: pertinent, relevant, on-topic, apt; see also Thesaurus:pertinent
    • 1924, Aristotle, Metaphysics. Translated by W. D. Ross. Nashotah, Wisconsin, USA: The Classical Library, 2001, Book 1, Part 5.
      Yet this much is germane to the present inquiry:
    • 1997, David Foster Wallace, “Tennis Player Michael Joyce’s Professional Artistry as a Paradigm of Certain Stuff About Choice, Freedom, Limitation, Joy, Grotesquerie, and Human Completeness”, in A Supposedly Fun Thing I'll Never Do Again, Kindle edition, Little, Brown Book Group:
      Connors was addicted to this racquet and kept using it even after Wilson stopped making it, forfeiting millions in potential endorsement money by doing so. Connors was eccentric (and kind of repulsive) in lots of other ways, too, none of which are germane to this article.
    • 2012 August 5, Nathan Rabin, “TV: Review: THE SIMPSONS (CLASSIC): “I Love Lisa” (season 4, episode 15; originally aired 02/11/1993)”, in (Please provide the book title or journal name)[1]:
      Valentine’s Day means different things for different people. For Homer, it means forking over a hundred dollars for a dusty box of chocolates at the Kwik-E-Mart after characteristically forgetting the holiday yet again. For Ned, it’s another opportunity to prove his love for his wife. Most germane to the episode, for Lisa, Valentine’s Day means being the only person in her entire class to give Ralph a Valentine after noticing him looking crestfallen and alone at his desk.
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

From germ(anium) +‎ -ane.[1]

 
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Wikipedia

NounEdit

germane (plural germanes)

  1. (inorganic chemistry) germanium tetrahydride, GeH4
  2. (organic chemistry, especially in combination) Any organic derivative of this compound.
SynonymsEdit
TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ IUPAC (2014), Henri A. Favre and Warren H. Powell, editors, Nomenclature of Organic Chemistry: IUPAC Recommendations and Preferred Names 2013, Cambdridge: Royal Society of Chemistry, pages 131, 143–144

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

AdverbEdit

germane

  1. in the German language
  2. Germanly; in the manner of a German

Related termsEdit


ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

germane

  1. Feminine plural of adjective germano.

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From germānus (real, sincere).

Pronunciation 1Edit

AdjectiveEdit

germāne

  1. masculine vocative singular of germānus

Pronunciation 2Edit

AdverbEdit

germānē (comparative germānius, superlative germānissimē)

  1. sincerely

ReferencesEdit