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See also: GID and GİD

Contents

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

gid (uncountable)

  1. A disease of sheep caused by tapeworm.

Etymology 2Edit

Compare Old French gigue. See jig (noun).

NounEdit

gid (plural gids)

  1. (obsolete) A fiddle.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for gid in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdverbEdit

gid

  1. I wish, if only
    Gid denne forbandede krig var ovre!
    How I wish that this accursed war were over.

VerbEdit

gid

  1. imperative of gide

Mauritian CreoleEdit

PronunciationEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French guider.

NounEdit

gid

  1. a guide

VerbEdit

gid

  1. Medial form of gide

PolishEdit

PronunciationEdit

Etymology 1Edit

NounEdit

gid m pers

  1. (Cieszyn Silesia) Alternative form of gizd.

Etymology 2Edit

From French guide.

NounEdit

gid m pers

  1. (literary) guide (someone who guides)
    Synonym: przewodnik
DeclensionEdit

NounEdit

gid m inan

  1. (travel) guide book
    Synonym: przewodnik
DeclensionEdit

Further readingEdit

  • gid in Polish dictionaries at PWN

ScotsEdit

AdjectiveEdit

gid (comparative mair gid, superlative maist gid)

  1. good