See also: glean

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡliːm/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -iːm

NounEdit

gleam (plural gleams)

  1. A small or indistinct shaft or stream of light.
    Synonyms: beam, ray
  2. (figuratively) A glimpse or hint; an indistinct sign of something.
    Synonyms: flicker, glimmer, trace
    The rescue workers preserved a gleam of optimism that they might still survive.
  3. Brightness or shininess; splendor.
    Synonyms: dazzle, lambency, shine
    • 1713, Alexander Pope, “Windsor-Forest. []”, in The Works of Mr. Alexander Pope, volume I, London: [] W[illiam] Bowyer, for Bernard Lintot, [], published 1717, OCLC 43265629:
      In the clear azure gleam the flocks are seen.
    • 1966, Bobby Hebb (lyrics and music), “Sunny”:
      Sunny, thank you for that smile upon your face / Sunny, thank you, thank you for the gleam that flows its grace

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gleam (third-person singular simple present gleams, present participle gleaming, simple past and past participle gleamed) (intransitive)

  1. To shine; to glitter; to glisten.
    Synonyms: glint, sparkle, glow, shine
  2. To be briefly but strongly apparent.
    Synonyms: flare, flash, kindle
  3. (obsolete, falconry) To disgorge filth, as a hawk.

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit