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See also: Gluten and glúten

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French gluten, borrowed from Latin glūten (glue).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gluten (countable and uncountable, plural glutens)

  1. (obsolete) Fibrin (formerly considered as one of the "animal humours"). [16th-19th c.]
    • 1621, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy, Oxford: Printed by Iohn Lichfield and Iames Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 216894069; The Anatomy of Melancholy, 2nd corrected and augmented edition, Oxford: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, 1624, OCLC 54573970, (please specify |partition=1, 2, or 3):
      , Bk.I, New York, 2001, p.147:
      The radical or innate is daily supplied by nourishment, which some call cambium, and make those secondary humours of ros and gluten to maintain it []
  2. (rare) Any gluey, sticky substance. [from 17th c.]
    • 1665, Robert Hooke, Micrographia, XXXVII:
      [T]he Fly suspends it self very firmly and easily, without the access or need of any such Sponges fill'd with an imaginary gluten, as many have, for want of good Glasses, perhaps, or a troublesome and diligent examination, suppos'd.
    • 1990, Camille Paglia, Sexual Personae:
      The tyrant machine is the female body, grinding and milling the pulp of matter, the gluten of human flesh.
  3. (cooking, biochemistry) The major protein in cereal grains, especially wheat; responsible for the elasticity in dough and the structure in baked bread. [from 19th c.]
    • 2004, Harold McGee, chapter 10, in On Food and Cooking: The Science and Lore of the Kitchen, Scribner, →ISBN:
      Chew on a small piece of dough, and it becomes more compact but persists as a gum-like, elastic mass, the residue that the Chinese named “the muscle of flour” and that we call gluten. It consists mainly of protein, and includes what may well be the largest protein molecules to be found in the natural world.
    • 2010, Felicity Cloake, Word of Mouth Blog, The Guardian, 10 Jun 2010:
      Unfortunately, wholemeal bread is, according to many experts, a tricky thing to get right, as the lower gluten content of the flour makes for dense results []
  4. (geology) A gluey, sticky mass of clay, bitumen etc. [from 19th c.]
    • 1988, James McPherson, Battle Cry of Freedom, Oxford 2004, p. 669:
      Despite constant rain that turned roads to gluten, the Yankees kept moving.

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: glu‧ten

NounEdit

gluten n (uncountable)

  1. gluten

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin glūten (glue).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gluten m (plural glutens)

  1. gluten

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Proto-Italic *gloiten, from Proto-Indo-European *glóh₁ytn̥, from *gleh₁y- (to stick; to spread, to smear).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

glūten n (genitive glūtinis); third declension

  1. glue

InflectionEdit

Third declension neuter.

Case Singular Plural
nominative glūten glūtina
genitive glūtinis glūtinum
dative glūtinī glūtinibus
accusative glūten glūtina
ablative glūtine glūtinibus
vocative glūten glūtina

Derived termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

gluten m (plural glutenes)

  1. (biochemistry) gluten

SwedishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin gluten (glue).

NounEdit

gluten n

  1. gluten