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EnglishEdit

VerbEdit

go through (third-person singular simple present goes through, present participle going through, simple past went through, past participle gone through)

  1. (literally) To travel from one end of something to the other.
    The train went through the tunnel.
  2. (obsolete) To execute or carry out.
  3. To examine or scrutinize (a number or series of things).
    Every morning, she went through her mail over a cup of coffee.
    • 2005, Elisabeth Kübler-Ross, David Kessler, On Grief and Grieving, →ISBN, page 135:
      After Betty died, Greg and Nicole had the job of going through her apartment and giving things away to charity, no small job since they felt the need to clean everything and make it look as good as possible before giving it away.
  4. To enact or recite the entire length of (something).
    • 2017 June 3, Daniel Taylor, “Real Madrid win Champions League as Cristiano Ronaldo double defeats Juv”, in The Guardian (London)[1]:
      Juve’s indignities in that period also featured a sending-off for Juan Cuadrado, one of their substitutes, and a late goal from Marco Asensio when the thousands of Madridistas were already going through their victory songs.
  5. To undergo, suffer, experience.
    I went through a lengthy immigration process before I was allowed across the border.
    She's yet to go through puberty, although she's already 17.
  6. To use up or wear out (clothing etc.).
    Her family drinks so much milk that they go through two gallons a week.
    I've gone through two pairs of shoes already this holiday.
  7. (intransitive) To progress to the next stage of something.
    If United don't lose by more than 2 goals, they should go through to the next round.
  8. (intransitive) To reach an intended destination after passing through some process.
    My payment hasn't gone through yet.
    I don't think my instant messages are going through.

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