go to bed

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Already attested in Old English as tō bedde gān.

VerbEdit

go to bed (third-person singular simple present goes to bed, present participle going to bed, simple past went to bed, past participle gone to bed)

  1. To lie down to sleep, put oneself in one's bed.
    • 2013 July 19, Ian Sample, “Irregular bedtimes may affect children's brains”, in The Guardian Weekly, volume 189, number 6, page 34:
      Irregular bedtimes may disrupt healthy brain development in young children, according to a study of intelligence and sleeping habits.  ¶ Going to bed at a different time each night affected girls more than boys, but both fared worse on mental tasks than children who had a set bedtime, researchers found.
    It's ten minutes past your bed-time; go to bed!
    It's been a long day—I think I'll just go to bed now.
    Synonyms: hit the sack, hit the hay, hit the rack; see also Thesaurus:go to bed
  2. (printing) Of a newspaper: to finish being prepared for printing.
    Coordinate term: put to bed
    • 1949, Max Eisen, How to Increase Daily Newspaper Circulation (page 43)
      The army newspaper "went to bed" several hours before the civilian one, []
    • 2007, Ikechukwu Enoch Nwosu, ‎E. O. Soola, Communication in Global, ICTs and Ecosystem Perspectives (page 238)
      So gone are the days when a Vanguard reporter who had gone to cover an assignment in Victoria Island may not get to his office at Kirikiri before the newspaper went to bed because the reporter was held back by the usual Lagos traffic jam.

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