See also: Grippe and grippé

Contents

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowing from French grippe, from gripper ‎(to seize), of Germanic origin; German greifen ‎(to grip)

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

grippe ‎(uncountable)

  1. (pathology) Influenza, the flu. [from 18 c.]
    • 1907, Robert W[illiam] Chambers, “chapter IV”, in The Younger Set (Project Gutenberg; EBook #14852), New York, N.Y.: A. L. Burt Company, published 1 February 2005 (Project Gutenberg version), OCLC 4241346:
      "Mid-Lent, and the Enemy grins," remarked Selwyn as he started for church with Nina and the children. Austin, knee-deep in a dozen Sunday supplements, refused to stir; poor little Eileen was now convalescent from grippe, but still unsteady on her legs; her maid had taken the grippe, and now moaned all day: "Mon dieu! Mon dieu! Che fais mourir!"

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

External linksEdit

influenza on Wikipedia.Wikipedia:influenza


FrenchEdit

NormanEdit

EtymologyEdit

This entry lacks etymological information. If you are familiar with the origin of this term, please add it to the page per etymology instructions.

NounEdit

grippe f ‎(plural grippes)

  1. (Jersey, pathology) flu

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

grippe f (plural grippes)

  1. Obsolete spelling of gripe

VerbEdit

grippe

  1. Obsolete spelling of gripe
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