See also: Guile

EnglishEdit

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English gile, from Anglo-Norman gile, from Old French guile (deception)[1], from Frankish *wigila (ruse). Cognate via Proto-Germanic with wile.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɡaɪl/
    • (file)
  • Rhymes: -aɪl

NounEdit

guile (countable and uncountable, plural guiles)

  1. (uncountable) Astuteness often marked by a certain sense of cunning or artful deception.
    • 2012 April 24, Phil Dawkes, “Barcelona 2-2 Chelsea”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      It was a result that owed a lot to a moment of guile from Ramires but more to a display of guts from the Brazilian and his team-mates after Terry's needless dismissal eight minutes before half-time for driving a knee into the back of Alexis Sanchez off the ball.
    • 2011 November 11, Rory Houston, “Estonia 0-4 Republic of Ireland”, in RTE Sport[2]:
      Estonia were struggling to get to grips with the game while Ireland were showing a composure and guile that demonstrated their experience in play-off ties.
  2. Deceptiveness, deceit, fraud, duplicity, dishonesty.
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

guile (third-person singular simple present guiles, present participle guiling, simple past and past participle guiled)

  1. To deceive, beguile, bewile.
Derived termsEdit
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

Etymology 2Edit

Variant forms.

NounEdit

guile

  1. Obsolete form of gold.
  2. Alternative form of gyle

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ T.F. Hoad, Concise Dictionary of English Etymology, →ISBN; headword guile

Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Frankish *wigila, see above

NounEdit

guile f (oblique plural guiles, nominative singular guile, nominative plural guiles)

  1. trickery; deception

DescendantsEdit

  • English: guile

ReferencesEdit

  • Godefroy, Frédéric, Dictionnaire de l'ancienne langue française et de tous ses dialectes du IXe au XVe siècle (1881) (guile)