See also: Gully

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • enPR: gŭl'ē, IPA(key): /ˈɡʌli/
  • (file)
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌli

Etymology 1Edit

From Middle English golet, from Old French goulet, from Latin gula (throat).

NounEdit

 
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gully (plural gullies)

  1. A trench, ravine or narrow channel which was worn by water flow, especially on a hillside.
  2. A small valley.
  3. (Britain) A drop kerb.
  4. A road drain.
  5. (cricket) A fielding position on the off side about 30 degrees behind square, between the slips and point; a fielder in such a position
  6. (Britain) A grooved iron rail or tram plate.
SynonymsEdit
  • gill (cleft, ravine)
Related termsEdit
TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

gully (third-person singular simple present gullies, present participle gullying, simple past and past participle gullied)

  1. (obsolete) To flow noisily.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Johnson to this entry?)
  2. (transitive) To wear away into a gully or gullies.

Etymology 2Edit

From Scots gully, of unknown origin.

NounEdit

gully (plural gullies)

  1. (Scotland, northern UK) A large knife.
ReferencesEdit

Gullies And Other Knives


ScotsEdit

EtymologyEdit

Origin unknown.

NounEdit

gully (plural gullies)

  1. large knife
    • God than he lewch and owre the dyk lap, / And owt of his scheith his gully owtgatt. (The Bannatyne Manuscript)