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See also: Haro, háro, and härö

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French haro, harou, of unknown origin.

InterjectionEdit

haro

  1. (obsolete) An exclamation of distress; alas.
  2. (obsolete, Channel Islands) A call for help, a demand for protection against harm, or for assistance to arrest an adversary.

AnagramsEdit


EsperantoEdit

 
homa haro, 200-obla grandiĝo
 
Esperanto Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia eo

EtymologyEdit

From English hair, German Haar.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈharo/
  • Hyphenation: ha‧ro
  • Rhymes: -aro
  • Audio:
    (file)

NounEdit

haro (accusative singular haron, plural haroj, accusative plural harojn)

  1. (an individual) hair
    Mi trovis haron en mia salado do mi resendis ĝin.I found a hair in my salad, so I sent it back.
    Holonyms: barbo, hararo, lipharoj, liphararo

Derived termsEdit


FinnishEdit

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

haro

  1. Indicative present connegative form of haroa.
  2. Second-person singular imperative present form of haroa.
  3. Second-person singular imperative present connegative form of haroa.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle French haro, from Old French haro, harou, from Frankish *harot, *hara (here; hither), akin to Old High German herot (here; hither), Old Saxon herod (here; hither), Middle Dutch hare (here) and English harrow.

PronunciationEdit

InterjectionEdit

haro

  1. cry for help
  2. cry of a huntsman to excite the hounds

NounEdit

haro m (uncountable)

  1. hue (cry)

IdoEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Esperanto haroEnglish hairGerman Haar.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

haro (plural hari)

  1. a hair (of a person's head)

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit