See also: Heit and -heit

East Central German

edit

Etymology

edit

Compare German heute.

Adverb

edit

heit

  1. (Erzgebirgisch) today
edit

Further reading

edit
2020 June 11, Hendrik Heidler, Hendrik Heidler's 400 Seiten: Echtes Erzgebirgisch: Wuu de Hasen Hoosn haaßn un de Hosen Huusn do sei mir drhamm: Das Original Wörterbuch: Ratgeber und Fundgrube der erzgebirgischen Mund- und Lebensart: Erzgebirgisch – Deutsch / Deutsch – Erzgebirgisch[1], 3. geänderte Auflage edition, Norderstedt: BoD – Books on Demand, →ISBN, →OCLC, page 60:

Hunsrik

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle High German hiute, from Old High German hiutu. Compare German heute, Dutch heden.

Pronunciation

edit

Adverb

edit

heit

  1. today
    Heit is die Familje kumplett.
    Today the family is complete.

Further reading

edit

Icelandic

edit

Pronunciation

edit

Etymology 1

edit

From Old Norse heit, from Proto-Germanic *gahaitą.

Noun

edit

heit n (genitive singular heits, nominative plural heit)

  1. promise, vow
Declension
edit
Synonyms
edit
Derived terms
edit
edit
  • heita (to be called; to promise)

Etymology 2

edit

Adjective

edit

heit

  1. inflection of heitur:
    1. feminine singular nominative strong positive degree
    2. neuter plural nominative strong positive degree
    3. neuter plural accusative strong positive degree

Norwegian Nynorsk

edit

Verb

edit

heit

  1. imperative of heita

Old High German

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Germanic *haiduz (manner).

Noun

edit

heit m

  1. Manner

Declension

edit

References

edit
  1. Joseph Wright, An Old High German Primer, Second Edition

Old Norse

edit

Etymology

edit

From Proto-Germanic *gahaitą, *haitą. Cognate with Old English ġehāt and bēot (from earlier bihāt), Old High German giheiz, Gothic 𐌲𐌰𐌷𐌰𐌹𐍄 (gahait).

Noun

edit

heit n

  1. promise, vow

Declension

edit

Derived terms

edit
edit

Descendants

edit
  • Icelandic: heit
  • Faroese: heit

Pennsylvania German

edit

Etymology

edit

From Middle High German hiute, from Old High German hiutu (today). Compare German heute, Dutch heden.

Adverb

edit

heit

  1. today

West Frisian

edit

Etymology

edit

A former term of endearment which has widely displaced faar, just as mem (mother) has displaced moer. Cognate with North Frisian aatj (father), most likely from Proto-Germanic *attô, whence also Gothic 𐌰𐍄𐍄𐌰 (atta). The h- would appear to be prothetic; compare the variant deite, which is further comparable to East Frisian Low German Tatte, English dad, etc.

Pronunciation

edit

Noun

edit

heit c (plural heiten, diminutive heitsje)

  1. father, dad
    Synonym: (in compounds) faar
    Coordinate term: mem

Further reading

edit
  • heit”, in Wurdboek fan de Fryske taal (in Dutch), 2011