hermitage

See also: Hermitage

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French ermitage. Compare Medieval Latin hermitagium. See English hermit.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhɜː(ɹ)mɪtɪdʒ/

NounEdit

hermitage (plural hermitages)

  1. A house or dwelling where a hermit lives.
    • 1887, H. Rider Haggard, She: A History of Adventure[1]:
      I saw the huge rocking-stone, that had been violently depressed by him as he sprang, fly back when relieved of his weight till, for the first time during all these centuries, it got beyond its balance, fell with a most awful crash right into the rocky chamber which had once served the philosopher Noot for a hermitage, and, I have no doubt, for ever sealed the passage that leads to the Place of Life with some hundreds of tons of rock.
  2. A place of seclusion.
  3. A period of seclusion.

TranslationsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch hermitage, from Old French ermitage, from Latin heremitagium.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɦɛr.miˈtaː.ʒə/
  • Hyphenation: her‧mi‧ta‧ge
  • Rhymes: -aːʒə

NounEdit

hermitage f (plural hermitages)

  1. hermitage (dwelling of a hermit)
    Synonyms: kluis, kluizenarij

Related termsEdit