hold out

See also: holdout

EnglishEdit

Alternative formsEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

VerbEdit

hold out (third-person singular simple present holds out, present participle holding out, simple past and past participle held out)

  1. (transitive, literally) To hold (something) out; to extend (something) forward.
    He held out his hand, and I grabbed it.
    • 1883, Robert Louis Stevenson, Treasure Island
      I held out my hand, and the horrible, soft-spoken, eyeless creature gripped it in a moment like a vise. I was so much startled that I struggled to withdraw; but the blind man pulled me close up to him with a single action of his arm.
  2. (figurative) To offer, present (a hope, possibility, opportunity etc.)
    The prospectus held out the promise of enormous profits to be made.
  3. (idiomatic, often with for) To wait, or refuse in hopes of getting something better (from a negotiation, etc.)
    I am holding out for more money.
    How long has he been holding out?
  4. (idiomatic) To survive, endure.
    How long can they hold out without water?
    • 2011 September 2, “Wales 2-1 Montenegro”, in BBC[1]:
      Stevan Jovetic gave Montenegro hope when he unleashed a pile-driver but Wales held out for a much-needed win.
  5. (idiomatic, usually with on) To withhold something.
    You've got a key! Why have you been holding out on me?
  6. (transitive) To set something aside or save it for later.
    Pack the boxes, but hold out a few blue ones for later.

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout § Translations.

NounEdit

hold out (plural hold outs)

  1. Alternative spelling of holdout.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit