hommage

See also: Hommage

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French hommage.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /oʊˈmɑːʒ/, /ɒˈmɑːʒ/

NounEdit

hommage (countable and uncountable, plural hommages)

  1. A homage, especially something in an artwork which has been done in respectful imitation of another artist.
    • 1991 November 29, Jonathan Rosenbaum, “His Master's Vice”, in Chicago Reader[1]:
      There's a clip from his Pickup on South Street in Scorsese's The King of Comedy, and extended hommages to other Fuller films in Godard's Breathless and Spielberg's Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom.)
    • 2002, Maria Luisa Ardizzone, Guido Cavalcanti, page 150:
      It is certainly true that Pound wanted to pay hommage to Guido.
    • 2007 April 30, Anthony Tommasini, “Doing Everything but Playing the Music”, in New York Times[2]:
      The piece is like an hommage to Ives: atmospheric and thickly textured music with multiple elements happening at once.

See alsoEdit

AnagramsEdit


DutchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle Dutch homagie, from Middle French homage, from Old French homage, with subsequent adaptation to French hommage in modern Dutch.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˌɦɔˈmaː.ʒə/
  • (file)
  • Hyphenation: hom‧ma‧ge
  • Rhymes: -aːʒə

NounEdit

hommage m (plural hommages)

  1. homage, hommage
    Synonyms: eerbetoon, hulde

FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French homage, hommage, from Medieval Latin hominaticum (homage, the service of a vassal or 'man'), from Latin homo (a man, in Medieval Latin a vassal).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hommage m (plural hommages)

  1. homage
    rendre hommage à
    pay homage to

Derived termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Middle EnglishEdit

NounEdit

hommage

  1. Alternative form of homage