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See also: Hub

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EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From earlier hubbe, which has the same immediate origin as hob. Hub was originally a dialectal word; its ultimate origin is unknown.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /hʌb/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -ʌb

NounEdit

hub (plural hubs)

  1. The central part, usually cylindrical, of a wheel; the nave.
  2. A point where many routes meet and traffic is distributed, dispensed or diverted.
    • 2013 June 8, “The new masters and commanders”, in The Economist, volume 407, number 8839, page 52:
      From the ground, Colombo’s port does not look like much. []   But viewed from high up in one of the growing number of skyscrapers in Sri Lanka’s capital, it is clear that something extraordinary is happening: China is creating a shipping hub just 200 miles from India’s southern tip.
    Hongkong airport is one of the most important air traffic hubs in Asia.
  3. (computing) A computer networking device connecting several ethernet ports. See switch.
  4. (surveying) A stake with a nail in it, used to mark a temporary point.
  5. A male weasel; a buck; a dog; a jack.
  6. (obsolete) The hilt of a weapon.
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Halliwell to this entry?)
  7. (US) A rough protuberance or projecting obstruction.
  8. (video games) An area in a video game from which most or all of the game's levels are accessed.
    Peach's Castle in Super Mario 64 is an early example of a hub world.
    • 2009, Game Informer Magazine: For Video Game Enthusiasts, page 62:
      First of all, the game is split into discrete levels joined by a hub world.
    • 2010, EZ Guides: The Games of the Decade:
      The loot system is as constant and unyielding as the endlessly respawning enemies: it's an obsessive's nirvana, leading to as much time navigating the inventory screen as the game's hub world and dungeons.
    • 2014, Tobias Winnerling, Early Modernity and Video Games, page 206:
      Souls, which function as both currency and experience points, are slowly collected as the player works through a stage, and can only be spent at Nexus, the hub world that players are transported to between stages.
  9. (science fiction) A planet which serves as a hub.
    • 1965, John Wood Campbell, editor, Analog Science Fact/science Fiction, page 43:
      Otherwise, our beautiful tree might become a definite nuisance on any Hub world to which it is introduced.
    • 2007, Aaron Michael Fanthorpe, Genesis Project: Prelude to Destiny, volume 1, page 8:
      A hub world in the Kasna Republik, Kasnearfar was a cosmopolitan port for beings across the Four Galaxies.
    • 2012, Ted White, Sideslip[1]:
      But something was shaping up—something incomprehensible and vast, concerning the Hub Worlds, something that was apparently tangled in and directly related to tens of thousands of years of interacting histories.
    a hub in the road
  10. A goal or mark at which quoits, etc., are thrown.
  11. A hardened, engraved steel punch for impressing a device upon a die, used in coining, etc.
  12. A screw hob.
  13. A block for scotching a wheel.

Derived termsEdit

SynonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

AnagramsEdit


CzechEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hub f

  1. genitive plural of houba

NounEdit

hub f

  1. genitive plural of huba

VerbEdit

hub

  1. second-person singular imperative of hubit

ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

English

NounEdit

hub m (invariable)

  1. hub (transport, computing)

PortugueseEdit

NounEdit

hub m (plural hubs)

  1. (networking) hub (device for connecting multiple Ethernet devices such as they act as a single network segment)

SpanishEdit

NounEdit

hub m (plural hubs)

  1. (networking) hub

White HmongEdit

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

hub

  1. a clay pot or vase, especially as used for storing food or water

ReferencesEdit

  • Ernest E. Heimbach, White Hmong - English Dictionary (1979, SEAP Publications)