EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English humain, humayne, from Old French humain, umain, from Latin hūmānus, from Latin homō (man). Cognate with Old English guma (man), whence the groom in English bridegroom.

PronunciationEdit

  • (UK) IPA(key): /hjuːˈmeɪn/
  • Rhymes: -eɪn
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

humane (comparative humaner or more humane, superlative humanest or most humane)

  1. Having or showing concern for the pain or suffering of another; compassionate.
    It is no longer considered humane to perform vivisection on research animals.
    As methods of execution go, beheading is more humane than drawing and quartering.
    • 1953, Samuel Beckett, Watt
      The unfortunate thing about Bando, said Arthur, is that it is no longer to be obtained in this unfortunate country. I understand that inferior products, such as Ostreine and Spanish Flies, may still be wheedled out of some of the humaner chemists, up and down the city, in the ten minutes or a quarter of an hour immediately following their midday meal.
  2. Pertaining to branches of learning concerned with human affairs or the humanities, especially classical literature or rhetoric.
    • 1624, Democritus Junior [pseudonym; Robert Burton], The Anatomy of Melancholy: [], 2nd edition, Oxford, Oxfordshire: Printed by John Lichfield and James Short, for Henry Cripps, OCLC 54573970, partition II, section 3, member 7:
      many divine precepts to counterpoise our hearts, special antidotes both in scriptures and humane authors, which who so will observe, shall purchase much ease and quietness unto himself.
  3. Obsolete spelling of human

SynonymsEdit

AntonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

AnagramsEdit


DanishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

humane

  1. definite singular of human
  2. plural of human

EsperantoEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /huˈmane/
  • Hyphenation: hu‧ma‧ne

AdverbEdit

humane

  1. humanely

GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

humane

  1. inflection of human:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular

LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From hūmānus (humane, noble)

AdverbEdit

hūmānē (comparative hūmānius, superlative hūmānissimē)

  1. humanly, in a human manner.
  2. humanely, kindly, politely; in a humane manner.

SynonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • humane”, in Charlton T[homas] Lewis; Charles [Lancaster] Short (1879) [] A New Latin Dictionary [], New York, N.Y.; Cincinnati, Ohio; Chicago, Ill.: American Book Company; Oxford: Clarendon Press.
  • humane”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • humane in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette
  • Carl Meißner; Henry William Auden (1894) Latin Phrase-Book[1], London: Macmillan and Co.
    • to bear a thing with resignation, composure: humane, modice, moderate, sapienter, constanter ferre aliquid
  • Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, 1st edition. (Oxford University Press)

Norwegian BokmålEdit

AdjectiveEdit

humane

  1. definite singular of human
  2. plural of human

Norwegian NynorskEdit

AdjectiveEdit

humane

  1. definite singular of human
  2. plural of human

SpanishEdit

VerbEdit

humane

  1. First-person singular (yo) present subjunctive form of humanar.
  2. Formal second-person singular (usted) present subjunctive form of humanar.
  3. Third-person singular (él, ella, also used with usted?) present subjunctive form of humanar.
  4. Formal second-person singular (usted) imperative form of humanar.

SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

humane

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of human.