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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Old French humide, from Latin humidus, correctly umidus (moist), from humere, correctly umere (to be moist), akin to ūvēns (moist), ūvidus, ūdus (moist); all from Proto-Indo-European *wegʷ-, *wogʷ- (wet). Cognate with Old Norse vǫkr (moist, damp, wet), Scots wak (moist, damp, wetness, moisture), English weaky (moist, wet). More at weaky.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ˈhjuːmɪd/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

humid (comparative humider, superlative humidest)

  1. Containing perceptible moisture (usually describing air or atmosphere); damp; moist; somewhat wet or watery
    humid earth
    1667 - John Milton, Paradise Lost (1667)
    Evening cloud, or humid bow.

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