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A stringed hurdy-gurdy

EtymologyEdit

Probably onomatopoeia in imitation of the sound produced by the stringed instrument.[1] Compare obsolete hirdy-girdy (an uproar; noise).[2] Attested from the 1740s.[1][2]

PronunciationEdit

  • (Received Pronunciation) IPA(key): /ˈhɜː.diˌɡɜː.di/, /ˌhɜː.diˈɡɜː.di/
  • (US) IPA(key): /ˈhɝː.diˌɡɝː.di/, /ˌhɝː.diˈɡɝː.di/
  • (file)
    ,
    (file)

AdjectiveEdit

hurdy-gurdy (not comparable)

  1. (humorous) Sounding like the Swedish language.

NounEdit

hurdy-gurdy (plural hurdy-gurdies)

  1. (music) A stringed instrument that produces a droning sound by turning a handle that connects to a wheel that rubs against a rosined string, with a keyboard also used to alter the pitch of the string.
  2. (music) Synonym of street organ.
    • 1956 [1880], Johanna Spyri, Heidi, translation of original by Eileen Hall, page 83:
      He flung open the door, and found there only a ragged boy with a hurdy-gurdy on his back.
  3. (US, California) A water wheel with radial buckets, driven by the impact of a jet.
  4. (fishing, sailing) A winch, a windlass.
    • 2009, Keith McLaren, A Race for Real Sailors[1], page 20:
      A pair of oars, a small mast and sail, pen boards to contain the fish, a bailer, a water jar, a bait knife, a compass, a small wooden winch called a hurdy gurdy, a fish gaff, and the tubs, trawls, floats, and anchors used to set gear was all that was required to equip it.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. 1.0 1.1 hurdy-gurdy” in Merriam–Webster Online Dictionary.
  2. 2.0 2.1 Oxford English Dictionary, 1884–1928, and First Supplement, 1933.