See also: idióma and idiòma

AsturianEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma, peculiarity; idiom).

NounEdit

idioma m (plural idiomes)

  1. language

SynonymsEdit


CatalanEdit

 
Catalan Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia ca

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma, peculiarity; idiom).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idioma m (plural idiomes)

  1. language

SynonymsEdit


EsperantoEdit

EtymologyEdit

From idiomo +‎ -a.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): [idiˈoma]
  • Rhymes: -oma
  • Hyphenation: i‧di‧o‧ma

AdjectiveEdit

idioma (accusative singular idioman, plural idiomaj, accusative plural idiomajn)

  1. idiomatic

ItalianEdit

 
Italian Wikipedia has an article on:
Wikipedia it

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma, peculiarity; idiom).

NounEdit

idioma m (plural idiomi)

  1. vernacular (the language of a people or a national language)
  2. idiom (a distinct language variety or dialect)
  3. languoid (a language or dialect without distinction)

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

From the Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idiōma n (genitive idiōmatis); third declension

  1. idiom (style of language)

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun (neuter, imparisyllabic non-i-stem).

Case Singular Plural
Nominative idiōma idiōmata
Genitive idiōmatis idiōmatum
Dative idiōmatī idiōmatibus
Accusative idiōma idiōmata
Ablative idiōmate idiōmatibus
Vocative idiōma idiōmata

Related termsEdit

DescendantsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • ĭdĭōma in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • ĭdĭōma in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré Latin-Français, Hachette, page 766/1
  • idioma in Ramminger, Johann (accessed 19.04.04) Neulateinische Wortliste: Ein Wörterbuch des Lateinischen von Petrarca bis 1700[1], pre-publication website, 2005-2016
  • idiōma” on page 820/3 of the Oxford Latin Dictionary (1st ed., 1968–82)
  • Niermeyer, Jan Frederik (1976), “idioma”, in Mediae Latinitatis Lexicon Minus, Leiden, Boston: Brill, page 508/1

PapiamentuEdit

NounEdit

idioma

  1. language

PortugueseEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma, peculiarity; idiom).

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

idioma m (plural idiomas)

  1. language (form of communication using words and structured with grammar)
    O idioma português.
    The Portuguese language.
    Synonyms: língua, linguagem, fala

Usage notesEdit

When referring to language as a general concept or as a programming language, linguagem is used rather than idioma. Idioma often refers specifically to the language used by a nation or people, in many cases the official language of that entity.

Related termsEdit


SpanishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Late Latin idioma, from Ancient Greek ἰδίωμα (idíōma, peculiarity; idiom).

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /iˈdjoma/, [iˈð̞jo.ma]
  • (file)

NounEdit

idioma m (plural idiomas)

  1. language
    Synonym: lengua
    el idioma español
    the Spanish language

Derived termsEdit

Usage notesEdit

  • For the particular use of language, as well as programming languages, lenguaje is used rather than idioma.
  • Note that Spanish words of Greek origin are masculine, even if they end in -a; cf. (e.g.) diploma.

Further readingEdit