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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Middle English illuminaten, originally from Latin illūminātum, supine of illūminō (lighten, light up, show off), from in + lūminō (light up), from lūmen (light). Cognate with Old English lȳman (to glow, shine). More at leam.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪlˈl(j)umɪneɪt/, /ɪlˈl(j)uməneɪt/ (verb)
  • (file)
    (verb)
  • IPA(key): /ɪlˈl(j)umɪnət/ (noun)

VerbEdit

illuminate (third-person singular simple present illuminates, present participle illuminating, simple past and past participle illuminated)

  1. (transitive) To shine light on something.
  2. (transitive) To decorate something with lights.
  3. (transitive, figuratively) To clarify or make something understandable.
  4. (transitive) To decorate the page of a manuscript book with ornamental designs.
  5. (transitive, figuratively) To make spectacular.
    • 2012 June 2, Phil McNulty, “England 1-0 Belgium”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Hodgson's approach may not illuminate proceedings in Poland and Ukraine but early evidence suggests they will be tough to break down.
  6. (intransitive) To glow; to light up.
    • 1994, Sylvia Carlson, ‎Verne Carlson, Professional Cameraman's Handbook →ISBN, page 494:
      Red diode in button illuminates when camera runs at speed set in five-digit speed selector.
    • 2011/2012, "Spectrum", written by Florence Welch and Paul Epworth, performed by Florence and the Machine, released on the album Ceremonials (2011):
      Say my name / and every color illuminates. / We are shining / []
  7. (intransitive) To be exposed to light.
  8. (transitive, military) To direct a radar beam toward.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

NounEdit

illuminate (plural illuminates)

  1. Someone thought to have an unusual degree of enlightenment.

AdjectiveEdit

illuminate (comparative more illuminate, superlative most illuminate)

  1. (obsolete) enlightened
    (Can we find and add a quotation of Bishop Hall to this entry?)

InterlinguaEdit

ParticipleEdit

illuminate

  1. past participle of illuminar

ItalianEdit

AdjectiveEdit

illuminate f pl

  1. feminine plural of illuminato

VerbEdit

illuminate

  1. second-person plural present of illuminare
  2. second-person plural imperative of illuminare
  3. feminine plural past participle of illuminare

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

illūmināte

  1. vocative masculine singular of illūminātus

ReferencesEdit