inceptor

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inceptor.

NounEdit

inceptor (plural inceptors)

  1. A beginner; one in the rudiments.
  2. (UK) One who is on the point of taking a Master of Arts degree at an English university.
    • 1670, Izaak Walton, “The Life of Mr. Rich[ard] Hooker, the Author of Those Learned Books of the Laws of Ecclesiastical Polity”, in The Lives of Dr. John Donne, Sir Henry Wotton, Mr. Richard Hooker, Mr. George Herbert. [], volume III, London: [] Tho[mas] Newcomb for Rich[ard] Marriott, [], OCLC 1179705955, pages 21–22:
      And in the year 1576. Febr. 23. Mr. Hookers Grace was given him for Inceptor of Arts, Doctor Herbert Weſtphaling, a man of note for Learning, being then Vice-chancellour [of the University of Oxford].

Further readingEdit

AnagramsEdit


LatinEdit

EtymologyEdit

incipiō +‎ -tor

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

inceptor m (genitive inceptōris); third declension

  1. beginner

DeclensionEdit

Third-declension noun.

Case Singular Plural
Nominative inceptor inceptōrēs
Genitive inceptōris inceptōrum
Dative inceptōrī inceptōribus
Accusative inceptōrem inceptōrēs
Ablative inceptōre inceptōribus
Vocative inceptor inceptōrēs

DescendantsEdit

  • English: inceptor

VerbEdit

inceptor

  1. first-person singular present passive indicative of inceptō

ReferencesEdit

  • inceptor”, in Charlton T. Lewis and Charles Short (1879) A Latin Dictionary, Oxford: Clarendon Press
  • inceptor”, in Charlton T. Lewis (1891) An Elementary Latin Dictionary, New York: Harper & Brothers
  • inceptor in Gaffiot, Félix (1934) Dictionnaire illustré latin-français, Hachette