inchoative

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inchoātīvus, formed by metathesis from incohātīvus, from incohō (to begin). Compare French inchoatif.

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

inchoative (not comparable)

  1. At the beginning, still in an unformed state.
    • W. Montagu
      Some inchoative or imperfect rays.
    • 1858, Thomas Carlyle, History Of Friedrich II Of Prussia
      Our first Piece is of Winter, or late Autumn, 1771,—while the solution of the Polish Business is still in its inchoative stages; …
  2. (grammar) Aspectually indicating that a state is about to be entered or is in the process of being entered.
    • 1974, Floyd L. Moreland & Rita M. Fleischer, Latin: An Intensive Course, University of California Press, page 12:
      The inchoative (inceptive) aspect of a verb expresses the beginning of an action. Example: He is beginning to crawl.
  3. (grammar) Inflected in or relating to the inchoative aspect.

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

inchoative (plural inchoatives)

  1. (grammar) An inchoative construction.

See alsoEdit

ReferencesEdit


GermanEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

inchoative

  1. inflection of inchoativ:
    1. strong/mixed nominative/accusative feminine singular
    2. strong nominative/accusative plural
    3. weak nominative all-gender singular
    4. weak accusative feminine/neuter singular