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EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin inculcātus, perfect passive participle of inculcō (impress upon, force upon), from in + calcō (tread upon, trample), from calx (heel).

PronunciationEdit

VerbEdit

inculcate (third-person singular simple present inculcates, present participle inculcating, simple past and past participle inculcated)

  1. (transitive) To teach by repeated instruction.
    • 1932, Aldous Huxley, Brave New World:
      Wordless conditioning ... cannot inculcate the more complex courses of behaviour.
  2. (transitive) To induce understanding or a particular sentiment in a person or persons.
    • 1943, C. S. Lewis, The Abolition of Man:
      The right defense against false sentiments is to inculcate just sentiments.

TranslationsEdit


ItalianEdit

LatinEdit

ParticipleEdit

inculcāte

  1. vocative masculine singular of inculcātus