infantile

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

Mid-15th century, "pertaining to infants," from Latin infantilis (pertaining to an infant), from īnfāns. Sense of "infant-like" is from 1772.[1]

AdjectiveEdit

infantile (comparative more infantile, superlative most infantile)

  1. Pertaining to infants.
    infantile paralysis
    • 1963, Margery Allingham, chapter 9, in The China Governess[1]:
      Eustace gaped at him in amazement. When his urbanity dropped away from him, as now, he had an innocence of expression which was almost infantile. It was as if the world had never touched him at all.
  2. Childish; immature.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  1. ^ Douglas Harper (2001–2022), “infantile”, in Online Etymology Dictionary.

FrenchEdit

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɛ̃.fɑ̃.til/
  • (file)

AdjectiveEdit

infantile (plural infantiles)

  1. infantile

Derived termsEdit

See alsoEdit

Further readingEdit


ItalianEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Latin infantilis.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /in.fanˈti.le/
  • Rhymes: -ile
  • Hyphenation: in‧fan‧tì‧le

AdjectiveEdit

infantile (plural infantili)

  1. infantile (relating to children or babies)
  2. infantile puerile, childish, babyish
    Synonym: puerile

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit

  • infantile in Treccani.it – Vocabolario Treccani on line, Istituto dell'Enciclopedia Italiana

AnagramsEdit


SwedishEdit

AdjectiveEdit

infantile

  1. absolute definite natural masculine singular of infantil.