inflation

See also: Inflation

EnglishEdit

 
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EtymologyEdit

From Middle English, borrowed from Old French inflation (swelling), from Latin īnflātiō (expansion", "blowing up), from īnflātus, the perfect passive participle of īnflō (blow into, expand), from in (into) + flō (blow). Morphologically inflate +‎ -ion.

PronunciationEdit

  • IPA(key): /ɪnˈfleɪʃən/
  • (file)
  • Rhymes: -eɪʃən

NounEdit

inflation (plural inflations)

  1. An act, instance of, or state of expansion or increase in size, especially by injection of a gas.
    The inflation of the balloon took five hours.
  2. (economics) An increase in the general level of prices or in the cost of living.
  3. (economics) A decline in the value of money.
  4. (economics) An increase in the quantity of money, leading to a devaluation of existing money.
  5. Undue expansion or increase, as of academic grades.
  6. (cosmology) An extremely rapid expansion of the universe, theorized to have occurred very shortly after the big bang.

AntonymsEdit

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TranslationsEdit

ReferencesEdit

  • (cosmology) Burgess & Quevedo, "The Great Cosmic Roller-Coaster Ride", Scientific American, November 2007, pg. 57.

AnagramsEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Old French inflation, borrowed from Latin inflātiō, inflātiōnem. Cf. also the dialectal enflaison, which may be of popular origin.

PronunciationEdit

NounEdit

inflation f (plural inflations)

  1. (economics) inflation

AntonymsEdit

Related termsEdit

Further readingEdit


Old FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

Borrowed from Latin īnflātiō.

NounEdit

inflation f (oblique plural inflations, nominative singular inflation, nominative plural inflations)

  1. (medicine) swelling

DescendantsEdit

  • English: inflation
  • French: inflation