inhability

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From in- +‎ hability (ability). Compare French inhabileté, inhabilité. See inability.

NounEdit

inhability

  1. (obsolete) unsuitableness; inability
    • a. 1677, Isaac Barrow, The Pleasantness of Religion (sermon)
      Wisedom conferrs : whatever evil blind ignorance, false presumption, unwary credulity, precipitate rashness, unsteady purpose, ill contrivance, backwardness, inhability, unwieldiness and confusion of thought beget.

Part or all of this entry has been imported from the 1913 edition of Webster’s Dictionary, which is now free of copyright and hence in the public domain. The imported definitions may be significantly out of date, and any more recent senses may be completely missing.
(See the entry for inhability in
Webster’s Revised Unabridged Dictionary, G. & C. Merriam, 1913.)