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See also: Initiative

Contents

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

From French initiative, from Medieval Latin *initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

PronunciationEdit

AdjectiveEdit

initiative (not comparable)

  1. Serving to initiate; inceptive; initiatory; introductory; preliminary.
  2. In which voter initiatives can be brought to the ballot.
    • John G. Matsusaka, "Direct Democracy and the Executive Branch", in, 2008, Shaun Bowler and Amihai Glazer, editors, Direct Democracy's Impact on American Political Institutions, Palgrave Macmillan, ISBN 9780230604452, page 122 [1]:
      The second row shows that initiative states fill more constitutional offices by election than noninitiative states, and the difference is statistically significant after controlling for region and population.

AntonymsEdit

TranslationsEdit

NounEdit

initiative (plural initiatives)

  1. A beginning; a first move.
  2. A new development; a fresh approach to something; a new way of dealing with a problem.
  3. The ability to act first or on one's own.
  4. An issue to be voted on, brought to the ballot by a sufficient number of signatures from among the voting public.

SynonymsEdit

Derived termsEdit

Related termsEdit

TranslationsEdit

The translations below need to be checked and inserted above into the appropriate translation tables, removing any numbers. Numbers do not necessarily match those in definitions. See instructions at Wiktionary:Entry layout#Translations.

Further readingEdit


FrenchEdit

EtymologyEdit

From Medieval Latin *initiativus (serving to initiate), from Late Latin initiare (to begin, Latin initiate), from Latin initium (beginning), from ineo (enter, begin).

NounEdit

initiative f (plural initiatives)

  1. initiative
    • Prendre l'initiative.

Further readingEdit