Open main menu

EnglishEdit

EtymologyEdit

inter- +‎ play

NounEdit

interplay (plural interplays)

  1. Interaction; reciprocal relationship.
    • 2011 September 24, Ben Dirs, “Rugby World Cup 2011: England 67-3 Romania”, in BBC Sport[1]:
      Shortly after Cueto completed a hat-trick in the space of 11 minutes, diving over in the left-hand corner once again after more clinical interplay between backs and forwards.
    • 2018 July 3, Ian Sample, “Routine DNA tests will put NHS at the 'forefront of medicine'”, in The Guardian[2]:
      Beyond its aim to bring patients the most effective treatments faster, the service is expected to generate a wealth of data on the interplay between DNA, health and lifestyles, which will become a powerful tool for research into cancer and other diseases.

TranslationsEdit

VerbEdit

interplay (third-person singular simple present interplays, present participle interplaying, simple past and past participle interplayed)

  1. to interact

ReferencesEdit

  • Joe Miller (24 January 2018), “Davos jargon: A crime against the English language?”, in BBC News[3], BBC

AnagramsEdit